225 Computers, Harvey the Hound, and LOTS of Smiling Faces Coming Right Up!

To view CBC coverage on this story, please visit: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/tsuutina-school-computers-donation-1.3303066

To view a video with coverage on this story, please visit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=olVlN_3Bgzs

It isn’t every day you have the opportunity to make a big impact on the community, but on November 3 2015, that’s exactly what the staff at ERA and a number of our corporate donors will do.

We have spent the past several weeks busily preparing for our largest donation on record, 225 computers. The computers will be presented to the Tsuut’ina Board of Education for distribution to their 3 schools: Chiila Elementary, Tsuut’ina Middle School and Tsuut’ina High School. Working with the Tsuut’ina Board of Education’s Director of Education, Lorianne Tenove, we will install a number of computers in each classroom at each of the organization’s schools. The schools’ current equipment, which is extremely old, will be replaced with the best quality, refurbished equipment available – and will give students reliable access to computers and the internet, tools the school board says the majority of students do not have at home.

The Tsuut’ina Nation is located on the Southwest boundary of the city of Calgary and has a population of approximately 2100. Under the terms and conditions of Treaty #7, the Tsuut’ina Board of Education promotes and supports lifelong learning through the highest quality educational experiences that nurture the cultural, academic, emotional and physical development of all Tsuut’ina community members. Youth members of the Tsuut’ina community attend one of their 3 schools, which currently have 443 students enrolled.

“The schools on Tsuut’ina Nation are bursting at the seams,” says Lorianne Tenove, Tsuut’ina Board of Education’s director of education. “Along with high enrollment comes a need for extra resources to support curriculum and 21st century learning. We are reorganizing spaces to accommodate Learning Commons in all of the schools so that students can have access to desktops and laptops to do research and project based learning. We are so grateful to have these extra resources donated to us so that we can continue to support our students successfully.”

Lorianne also noted that “Tsuut’ina has four schools; Chiila Elementary, Tsuut’ina Middle School, Tsuut’ina High School and Bullhead Adult Learning. There are 500 students that attend these schools and as we know, the Aboriginal population is that fastest growing population of all people in Canada. 60% of Tsuut’ina Nation members are under the age of thirty and Education is a high priority. Every year, there are 50-60 four year olds that enter school. With this increase in enrolment, we need more space, resources and technology to support student learning. We are all about engaging students to help them become successful. Computers and laptops offer us the opportunity to access programs, assist students with research for project based learning, supports students with diverse needs and allows students to work individually or collaboratively. Technology as we know it is the way to the future and we are so grateful for this donation. Siyisgass (Thank- you in Tsuut’ina).”

We wouldn’t have been able to accommodate this request without the help of our corporate partners, several of whom collaborated directly with us by providing equipment specifically for this donation. So a HUGE thank-you, or Siyisgass, goes out to Suncor, Fortis Alberta, TransCanada Corporation, Asset Canada, Altalink and Home Trust. We wanted donation day to be a special event for students, so we also invited Calgary Flames mascot Harvey the Hound to come out and help us present equipment to the school.

We would like to recognize our partners’ commitment to community; Robin Boschman, Manager, Corporate Communications at Altalink noted that, “Our community investment program at AltaLink is designed to empower kids across our province. We are happy to contribute to this donation that will give students the tools they need to be successful.”

We are certainly feeling the community love here, and can’t wait to see the kids’ faces on Tuesday when they learn that their schools are getting state of the art equipment, and that they’re getting a visit from the infamous Harvey the Hound!

Tsuut’ina Nation Schools to Receive Donation of 225 Computers

MEDIA NOTICE
October 27 2015

Tsuut’ina Nation Schools to Receive 225 Computers from Local Non-Profit
The Electronic Recycling Association and several of their corporate partners to provide a much-needed donation to benefit high-needs students

CALGARY, AB — On November 3, The Electronic Recycling Association (ERA) will deliver a truckload of computers to the Tsuut’ina Board of Education that will be distributed to Chiila Elementary School, Tsuut-ina Middle School and Tsuut’ina High School. ERA has partnered with a number of corporate donors to facilitate the donation, which will allow the schools to upgrade aging and slow equipment. A number of computers will be placed in each classroom to give students access to reliable hardware and the internet, tools the majority of students do not have access to at home. In addition, Calgary Flames mascot Harvey the Hound will attend the donation to interact with students.

“The schools on Tsuut’ina Nation are bursting at the seams,” says Lorianne Tenove, Tsuut’ina Board of Education’s director of education. “Along with high enrollment comes a need for extra resources to support curriculum and 21st century learning. We are reorganizing spaces to accommodate Learning Commons in all of the schools so that students can have access to desktops and laptops to do research and project based learning. We are so grateful to have these extra resources donated to us so that we can continue to support our students successfully.”

“We are really excited about this donation, it is ERA’s largest independent donation on record” says Bojan Paduh, founder and president of ERA. “The volume of equipment means every student at each of these Tsuut’ina Nation schools will directly benefit. We are also extremely grateful, and would like to recognize our corporate donors, specifically Suncor, Fortis Alberta, TransCanada Corporation, Asset Canada, Altalink and Home Trust for collaborating with us on this donation to ensure students are receiving the best quality refurbished equipment available.”

Media representatives are invited to attend and cover this donation story as ERA and Harvey the Hound present Tsuut’ina Nation schools with 225 computers.

Date: Tuesday, November 3, 2015

Time: 1:30 PM

Location: Chiila Elementary School
80 Cow Camp Road
Tsuut’ina Nation
T2W 3C4

Attendees: The Electronic Recycling Association (ERA)
Lorianne Tenove, Tsuut’ina Board of Education’s director of education
Chiila Elementary School
Harvey the Hound
Tsuut’ina Nation students

About Tsuut’ina Board of Education
Under the terms and conditions of Treaty #7, the Tsuut’ina Board of Education promotes and supports lifelong learning through the highest quality educational experiences that nurture the cultural, academic, emotional and physical development of all Tsuut’ina community members.

About the Electronic Recycling Association
Established in 2004, the ERA is a non-profit organization directed to reduce the environmental impact of improperly discarded toxic electronic waste by offering accessible services to help corporations and individuals manage their retiring IT assets. With reuse being the ERA’s top priority, every item that is received is examined for any remaining productive life and refurbished for reuse. True end of life items are transferred to accredited recyclers where a nil landfill contribution can be assured. The ERA is committed to supporting local charities and individuals in need through the provision of electronic equipment.

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Note:
Representatives from several of ERA’s corporate donor organizations (Suncor, Fortis Alberta, TransCanada Corporation, Asset Canada, Altalink and Home Trust) will be onsite and available for interviews.

Media inquiries may be directed to:

Lorianne Tenove
Director of Education
Tsuut’ina Board of Education
403-235-5484
ltenove@tsuutinaeducation.com
Kristi Gartner
Marketing and Communications Manager
Electronic Recycling Association
403-262-4488
Kristi@era.ca

We’re Launching a Brand New Website!

And we are looking for your feedback!

As always, it is our goal to ensure your interactions with ERA are professional, effective and seamless. For this reason we are getting ready to launch our new website, which will incorporate more interactive features and accessible information. Before we finalize the site, we want to give you the opportunity to provide feedback.

The test site can be viewed at https://www.era.ca/2020/

Please provide feedback in the comment field below, or email it to info@era.ca

We look forward to your feedback!

The team at ERA

Waste Reduction Week to Benefit UNICEF Thanks to ERA and Your Old Electronics!

In recognition of Waste Reduction Week, which runs from October 19th to 25th 2015, ERA will be hosting electronics collection events across Western Canada, with all proceeds to benefit UNICEF. There will be events in Calgary, Edmonton, Saskatoon and Winnipeg.

Individuals are invited to bring in unwanted electronic equipment to be confidentially processed. At the end of each event, equipment collected will be sorted and weighed by ERA. Rebates will be paid out to UNICEF according to ERA’s Moolah for Macros fundraising program, which attaches individual values to specific and/or operational equipment while peripherals and parts are paid out based on pounds collected.

Below are details specific to each collection event, including dates, times and other initiatives at each location.

Calgary

Location:     The CORE Shopping Centre, 324 8 Ave SW, Calgary, AB T2P 2Z2
Date:             Tuesday, October 20th & Wednesday, October 21st
Time:             11am to 2pm each day

Location:     Chinook Centre, 6455 Macleod Trail SW, Calgary, AB T2H 0K8
Date:             Thursday, October 22nd – Sunday, October 25th
Time:             During regular mall hours

Edmonton

Location:     Kingsway Mall,1 Kingsway Garden Mall Northwest, Edmonton, AB T5G 3A6
Date:             Saturday, October 24th 
Time:             During regular mall hours

Saskatoon

Location:     Saskatoon Market Mall, 2325 Preston Avenue, Saskatoon, SK S7J 2G2
Date:             Saturday, October 24th 
Time:             During regular mall hours

Winnipeg

Location:     cityplace , 333 St Mary Ave, Winnipeg, MB R3C 4A5
Date:             Saturday, October 24th 
Time:             During regular mall hours

Forward Thinking Student Association Kicks off School Year with a Sustainable Bang

Electronic Recycling Association and the Kwantlen Student Association offer responsible disposal of e-waste
Surrey, BC – In recognition of the start of a new school year, the Kwantlen Student Association (KSA) has partnered with the Electronic Recycling Association (ERA) to host an electronics collection and data destruction event for students, residents and businesses of Surrey, BC. Individuals are invited to bring in unwanted electronic equipment to be confidentially recycled. ERA will have an AmeriShred hard drive shredder onsite to physically destroy hard drives. The KSA’s REBOOT computer repair service will on-site offering advice for repairable computers.
The KSA and ERA have been working together to bring this event to campus and look forward to “be able to offer students a safe and environmentally-friendly option to dispose of their old electronics” says Alex McGowan the VP External Affairs. The hard drive shredder is a “practical and fun opportunity for students to ensure their data cannot be stolen or misplaced.“ The event will take place in the main courtyard at Kwantlen Polytechnic University’s Surrey campus. Any member of the community can bring computers, laptops, printers, keyboards, mice and cellphones for recycling to the event.

Event: Electronic Recycling & Hard Drive Shredding Day
Date: Thursday September 24, 2015
Location: Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Surrey Campus
12666 72 Ave, Surrey, BC, Main Courtyard
Time: 11:00 AM – 2:00 PM PST

For anyone unable to attend the event, the Kwantlen Student Association has ERA secure drop bins on the KPU Surrey and Richmond campuses until September 30, 2015. Any items accepted by ERA for recycling can be dropped in the bins during business hours at KSA REBOOT offices (Cedar 1225, Surrey Campus and in the KSA Lounge adjacent the Library on Richmond Campus).

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For more information please contact:
Alex McGowan, VP External Affairs
Kwantlen Student Association
604.599.2110 external@kusa.ca
Kristi Gartner, Marketing & Communications Manager
Electronic Recycling Association
403-262.4488 ext. 104 Kristi@era.ca

About the Kwantlen Student Association
The KSA represents more than 17,500 students enrolled at the four Metro Vancouver campuses of Kwantlen Polytechnic University. The KSA actively seeks to enhance campus life, delivers student services, supports on-campus activities, and provides support for our student members.

About the Electronic Recycling Association
Established in 2004, the ERA is a non-profit organization directed to reduce the environmental impact of improperly discarded toxic electronic waste by offering accessible services to help corporations and individuals manage their retiring IT assets. With reuse being the ERA’s top priority, every item that is received is examined for any remaining productive life and refurbished for reuse. True end of life items are transferred to accredited recyclers where a nil landfill contribution can be assured. The ERA is committed to supporting local charities and individuals in need through the provision of electronic equipment to charities and individuals alike

Consumerism, Mass Extinction and our Throw-Away Society

“The throw-away society is a human society strongly influenced by consumerism. The term describes a critical view of over-consumption and excessive production of short-lived or disposable items.”

throw away society for blog postImage c/o  http://www.cartoonmovement.com/cartoon/924

 We’ve got kind of a problem here. On the right side of the pendulum, consumerism has reached an all-time high, with products reaching their planned obsolescence within absurdly short timespans and new products being rolled out (and bought) by the millions every day. And, since every action has an equal and opposite reaction, we have to expect consequences. So, on the left side of the pendulum, we’re looking at the very real possibility of a mass extinction, the sixth on record for our planet and the first since the extinction of the dinosaurs – sixty five million years ago.

You could argue that extinction is a natural phenomenon and you’d be right, in isolated situations. But considering the scale of this potential mass extinction, we’re talking the possible loss of three fourths of earth’s current species[1], it’s hard to view it as anything other than grossly unnatural. Rather than the large-scale natural disasters like meteors or successive volcanic eruptions believed to have caused past mass extinctions, scientists say this one’s different. Human activities including deforestation, over-fishing, poaching and global warming could be to blame for a sixth mass extinction: Human activities largely driven by our society’s demand for having more than we need, resulting in the highest ever annual global waste generation on record[2]. I’m not saying our garbage is the only or even the primary cause of our current environmental situation, but it plays a significant role, and the ‘must-have mindset’ driving it an even bigger one.

waste-projection-graph for blogGlobal waste generation with projected increase (Joseph Stromberg, 2013)

 This isn’t good. We’re already seeing very real and devastating examples of the environmental impact of our throw-away society. Ever heard of “The Great Pacific Garbage Patch”? It’s not an urban legend. Google it.

There are, obviously, a boatload of reasons why society has evolved into such a remarkable waste producing machine. Whether its food, housing, energy or consumer products, we are taking more from the planet than we ever have before, and there’s more of us doing it. Most of us eat more, use more, buy more and have more than we need. And we throw more of it in the garbage. A lot more. But why?

Because, on average, we can.

because I can for blog

Take, for example, this scenario. In 1977, the average annual income per capita (US) was $5,785.00 ($20,256.00 2013 CPI-U-RS adjusted dollars). In 2013, the average annual income per capita was $28,829.00[3]. The Apple II (one of the first mass produced microcomputers) came out in 1977, and could be purchased for an average of $1950.00[4] (depending on memory) with a base price of $1298.00[5]. That means for the average person to buy the average Apple II computer in 1977, they would need to shell out a whopping 33.7% of their annual income. For the purposes of this scenario, and understanding that this is an oversimplified example for argument sake, I’ll stick with Apple; the average price of a MacBook in 2013 was $1,286.00[6]. So, for the average person to buy the average Apple computer in 2013, they would need to spend just 4% of their annual income.

2013 Macbook for blog post

2013 MacBook, available for 4% of your annual income in 2013

Apple_II_tranparent_800 for blog

1977 Apple II Computer, available for just 33.7% of your annual income in 1977  

Needless to say, affordability for tech items has increased considerably. This example is just for computers, but think about all of the other equipment we rely on that was once out of reach for the average person. Vehicles, televisions, phones, electronic appliances – in developed nations these things are staples, we all have them – multiples of them even, and we upgrade them at an alarming rate. Drawn in by advertising that boasts leading fuel economy, high efficiency, faster processing speed, better graphics, we buy things we think will improve our quality of life, and often even be better for the environment. And don’t get me wrong, sometimes they are. But only if we find a better way to manage the stuff we get rid of to make room for the new, improved versions.

If you’re taking your used items to the dump, you probably need to re-evaluate how much better for the environment that new item is. The environmental cost of these toxic items when carelessly discarded is staggering in comparison to the environmental (or other) benefits of that new equipment. Accounting for a comparatively small percentage of the total waste in our landfills, roughly 2%, e-waste represents nearly 70% of the toxic waste in landfills. Our tech addiction is literally poisoning the planet.

The Electronic Recycling Association (ERA) is focused specifically on reducing the waste produced by personal electronics like computers, laptops, phones and other tech you’d find in your average office. We take advantage of the short primary use cycle for this equipment, which more often than not means that there is a remarkable amount of productive life remaining in equipment when it arrives at our facilities. So we wipe it, fix it up, and prepare it for secondary use. Equipment is either provided to deserving charities and NPOs through our Canada-wide technology donation programs or sold at a low cost to individuals and companies not qualified for our donation programs but unable to afford brand new equipment. We’ll also often get equipment in that we can’t fix, so these items are sent over to our recycling partners, who responsibly dismantle and separate materials for recycling, ensuring a negligible landfill contribution. All donations are conditional upon signing an agreement binding the recipient to return the equipment to ERA when they no longer want it or it stops working for responsible processing.

This option is a win-win. Few virgin natural resources are required to refurbish equipment, and often it has years of productive life remaining. Thousands of charitable organizations receive and use this equipment and are able to direct funds to program development as opposed to purchasing expensive new tech gear. Keeping operational tech in use longer reduces the demand for new equipment and lessens the strain on resources. When, inevitably, equipment reaches end of life, it’s processed in the most environmentally responsible manner currently available. There is room for improvement there too though, while recycling is a significantly better option than trashing, it is still a resource consuming process.

We’re doing what we can, but we can’t reuse or recycle equipment we aren’t receiving.

So why aren’t people utilizing reuse and recycling programs instead of trashing their stuff? Maybe it’s because society isn’t aware of the impact their waste is actually having on our planet, or maybe the process to reuse or recycle household items isn’t simple enough, or maybe individuals don’t think their personal choices will have a measurable impact so they opt out of green practices all together. Or maybe fear or denial make it impossible to imagine our planet without 75% of the species that make it such a beautiful and diverse place. A place where we can actually live. But it’s a reality, one that has already begun and will directly affect our generation and the generation of our children. This is in each of our back yards.

YIMBY for blog postImage c/o http://www.pccfarmlandtrust.org/yes-in-my-backyard/

Let’s stop thinking about how we can change the future of our planet and start doing something about it. We can take action, individually, in each of our lives that cumulatively will have a big impact. Just because we can afford new things doesn’t mean we need them, or that the things we already have are no longer serving a purpose. Consumerism, and the throw-away society, are vicious cycles – ones each and every one of us are voting for through our personal lifestyle choices – and we’re circling the drain.

How much do we need to lose before we see the impact of our lifestyles and change the way we live?

What are you doing to lessen your personal environmental impact? What is the company you work for doing? How can our leaders push for more change?

[1] Angad Singh, for CNN. ‘A New Mass Extinction Could Be Underway – CNN.Com’. CNN. N.p., 2015. Web. 23 June 2015.

[2] @JosephStromberg, Follow. ‘When Will We Hit Peak Garbage?’. Smithsonian. N.p., 2013. Web. 23 June 2015.

[3] Census.gov, ‘Historical Income Tables – People – U.S Census Bureau’. N.p., 2015. Web. 23 June 2015.

[4] Pearson, The. ‘1970’S Computers From The People History Site’. Thepeoplehistory.com. N.p., 2015. Web. 23 June 2015.

[5] Deffree, Suzanne. ‘Apple II Goes On Sale, June 5, 1977′. EDN. N.p., 2015. Web. 23 June 2015.

[6] Theregister.co.uk,. ‘PC Sales Shrank Less Than Expected During Back-To-School 2013′. N.p., 2015. Web. 23 June 2015.

Good News for High-Needs Elementary School

The ERA originally met St. Peter School’s Principal Bruce Campbell when he came to pick up a laptop that had been donated to the school by ERA behalf of an anonymous donor. While speaking with him, it became evident that students at the school were in need of much more than one laptop. Knowing this, the ERA decided we needed to help these deserving students by providing them with the technology necessary to excel at their schoolwork and be given the same opportunities as their peers.

On June 17,  ERA presented an assembly of children (between the ages of 5 and 11) at St. Peter School with laptops for 20 students to take home and share with their families. But we knew these kids deserved something extra special, so we called up The Calgary Flames mascot, the one and only Harvey the Hound, and asked him if he would come out and present the laptops with us. And, in exchange for just one three pound Milkbone, he did! We had to keep him hidden though, to ensure complete surprise. There is very little you can hide a six and a half foot bipedal dog-human behind, but we managed, and somehow not a single student spotted him prior to the big reveal.

St Peter Assembly before
Just a regular, everyday assembly…

For the kids, It started off as just a regular assembly, and from my vantage point at the back of the gymnasium I could see more than a few distracted faces among the group (sorry Mr. Campbell….) Principal Campbell spoke to students about the importance of recycling and reuse, especially in regard to electronic equipment, and told the students that some of them would be receiving their very own laptops in just a few moments. Then, as the wheeled cage containing the laptops slowly entered the gym through a side door, I started to see some heads turn and heard a whispered… “Harvey!” This realization spread quickly throughout the gymnasium and turned into a full blown frenzy as the famous mascot pushed a cart full of technology in…

Please click the image to view the video on YouTube.

Please click the image for video
Nearly there…

 

And finally, the grand entrance! Please click the image to view the video of the big surprise (students notice something amiss at 0:42)

Harvey's grand entrance
The grand entrance!

Once students had (mostly) recovered from their shock and excitement, Principal Campbell began announcing the laptop recipients, who came to the front of the gym for a high-five or hug and photo with Harvey.

Harvey with kids 1
Hugs with Harvey!

The donation portion of the assembly lasted roughly half an hour, after which we took the lucky laptop recipients outside to take some more photos. It was raining, but nobody seemed to notice.

St Peter group shot 1
CHEESE!!
St Peter group shot 2
Testing out their new tech, with IT director Harvey

Today was an amazing day, we saw lots of smiles and are so honored to have been able to help these awesome kids. At the end of the day, ERA’s job is simply to facilitate donations like these. True credit goes to our corporate and individual donors, who provide ERA with their unwanted equipment so we can wipe it and refurbish it for reuse by people who simply don’t have the resources for new equipment. Because many of us take access to technology for granted, its easy to forget just how necessary it is and how much of a hurdle even simple tasks can be without it. These laptops are going to make a big difference to the kids who received them and their families, and may even help open up some new opportunities for them.

So thank you to all of our donors, The Calgary Flames, for lending us their beloved Harvey, and of course the staff at St. Peter School for helping us keep the secret, arranging all the details of today’s event and letting us spend some time with their extra special students.

Cheers!

 

Calgary Flames Mascot and Local Businessman Plan a Big Surprise for Students

The Electronic Recycling Association and Harvey the Hound will surprise 20 students at a Calgary elementary school with laptops just in time for summer

Harvey 2

Students at St. Peter School will be paid a special visit by The Calgary Flames’ mascot, Harvey the Hound on June 17. The Electronic Recycling Association (ERA) has donated 20 refurbished laptops which will be presented to deserving students at St. Peter School on Wednesday morning.

“We are really excited to have Harvey present this donation,” says Bojan Paduh, founder and president of ERA. “We often make donations to students, but to kick off the summer we wanted to do something extra special and so decided to surprise the kids by inviting Harvey the Hound to their school to present the donation.”

Bruce Campbell, principal of St. Peter School said “We are blessed to be fortunate enough to receive these laptops for our students to utilize at home and enhance their learning.” St. Peter School will determine which 20 students between the ages of 5 and 11 the laptops will be given to.

Media representatives are invited to attend and cover this donation story as ERA and Harvey the Hound present 20 students of St. Peter School with their very own laptops.

Date: Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Time: 10:45 AM

Location: St. Peter School
720 – 58th Street S.E.
Calgary, Alberta
T2A 5L9

Attendees: The Electronic Recycling Association (ERA)
St. Peter School
Harvey the Hound
St. Peter School students

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About the Electronic Recycling Association
Established in 2004, the ERA specializes in waste electronics management, reuse and recycling in Canada. We are unwaveringly committed to reducing electronic waste by extending their lifecycle through electronics donating services, recycling non-reusable electronics, computers, laptops, phones and more. With depots all across Canada, the ERA provides a great way to recycle electronic equipment safely and securely.

About St. Peter Elementary School
St. Peter School is a Kindergarten to Grade Six school located in the community of Penbrooke Meadows. There are 330 students with very diverse leaning needs.

Media inquiries may be directed to:
Kristi Gartner
Marketing and Communications Manager
Electronic Recycling Association
(Office) 1- 403-262-4488 ext 104
Kristi@era.ca

Karen Ryhorchuk
Senior Communications Specialist
Calgary Catholic School District
P: 403-500-2602
C: 403-605-1186

ERA is Looking for Volunteers!

We’re currently looking for outgoing volunteers to help us raise awareness about the environmental implications of e-waste and get the public excited about reuse and recycling!

Awareness Ambassador – Volunteer Position

The Electronic Recycling Association (ERA) is a non-profit organization committed to ending the e-waste crisis in Canada and providing hundreds of Canadian families in need with donated computer equipment each year. We are looking for enthusiastic, outgoing volunteers to raise awareness about us. If you are looking for a way to give back to the community while earning some great experience, this is the volunteer position for you! All volunteers will be provided a free ERA volunteer t-shirt or sweatshirt and will receive their choice of a free, refurbished laptop or desktop computer upon completion of their volunteer hours. Individual volunteers are welcome, but we encourage you to bring a friend, after all two heads are better than one, and more fun!

We are currently recruiting Awareness Ambassadors (AAs), who will go out into the community and speak with their neighbours about the benefits of working with ERA for their reuse and recycling needs.
There is a 12 hour minimum time commitment, which will be broken into shifts based on the volunteer’s schedule and availability. Shifts will be a minimum of 2 hours and a maximum of 6 hours each.

Weekend and evening AAs will be assigned residential routes, weekday AAs will be assigned business routes. Once 12 hours have been completed, the volunteer will receive their choice of refurbished laptop or desktop computer (including associated peripherals – monitor, keyboard and mouse). The volunteer will also receive a volunteer certificate of recognition and a signed reference letter from our Volunteer Manager.

All volunteers will be required to attend an orientation session prior to beginning their volunteer hours.

Residential AAs

Territory will be assigned in advance, along with a form outlining each individual home on the route. Volunteer must get resident’s initial at each address. If residents are not available, flyer is to be left in the mailbox (if there is ‘no solicitation’ sign, volunteer must not approach or leave flyer behind). Volunteer is responsible for transportation to and from their assigned territory. Volunteer must be dressed in business casual attire with an ERA volunteer t-shirt (which will be provided at no cost by ERA). Comfortable shoes are recommended (running shoes etc.)

Volunteer will be provided with a script and FAQ sheet to help them communicate the ERA’s purpose. Volunteer will be provided with an on-call ERA employee’s phone number in the event questions come up that the volunteer is unable to answer.

Business AAs

Territory will be assigned in advance, along with a form outlining each individual business on the route. Volunteer must get the name and initial of an employee at each business. Volunteers are asked to avoid visiting businesses with signs requesting no solicitation. Volunteer is responsible for transportation to and from their assigned territory. Volunteer must be dressed in business casual attire with an ERA volunteer t-shirt (which will be provided at no cost by ERA). Comfortable shoes are recommended (running shoes etc.)

Volunteer will be provided with a script and FAQ sheet to help them communicate the ERA’s purpose. Volunteer will be provided with an on-call ERA employee’s phone number in the event questions come up that the volunteer is unable to answer.

Required Skills and Experience

- Fluent in English
– Good verbal communication skills
– Outgoing, positive personality and friendly demeanour; ability to approach new people with confidence
– Presentable appearance
– Comfortable walking door to door and standing for extended periods of time
– Minimum age requirement of 16, volunteers under the age of 18 must obtain signed parental or legal guardian consent form to participate
– Previous volunteer experience with the public will be considered an asset
– Passion for the environment and giving back to the community!

If you are interested in this opportunity, please forward your resume and cover letter to Kristi Gartner at kristi@era.ca or by fax to 403.206.7585. Thank you for your interest!

ERA Launches new Fundraising Program for Charities!

The ERA is pleased to announce the launch of our new fundraising program!

Why: This program aims to give organizations the opportunity to earn cash for collecting unwanted electronics while keeping these toxic items out of landfills and helping ERA continue to provide less fortunate Canadians with tech equipment.

Catholic Family Service

What: The ERA’s E-Waste Fundraising Program works on a minimum equipment requirement as well as total weight collected. To earn rebates, your group must collect a minimum of 50 qualified items (laptops, computers, tablets and cell phones/smart phones). Anything greater than that will be weighed and will earn your organization $.10 (ten cents) per pound. There is no cost to participate, and ERA will provide necessary resources (staff to assist with collection, collection bins, removal of equipment) as well as handle the creation of marketing materials for your event (posters/flyers for you to distribute). All you’ll need to do is share event details with all of your contacts to ensure your collection is well attended so you receive the maximum return in support of your cause.

Who: This program is open to charities, non-profit organizations, care facilities (day-cares, seniors facilities and health care facilities), educational institutions and community associations. We will also partner with for-profit organizations to host fundraising collections with proceeds going to the charity of their choice.

Where: Events can be held anywhere with space for our trucks and bins.

BC Truck  Collection cage 2015

When: Contact us with tentative dates for your fundraising event and we will confirm resources.

How: Once logistics are covered, it’s up to you to raise awareness and get your networks involved! The more people who know about your fundraiser, the more will come out and drop off their unwanted equipment. The sky’s the limit!

Capilano Earth Day Collection

For more information, or to book your fundraiser, please contact Kristi Gartner: kristi@era.ca or 1-877-9-EWASTE